Home » Cebuano Culture: Funeral Practices and Burial Customs in the Philippines, Sinulog Festival, Sandugo, List of Bohol Festivals, Cebuano Theater by Books LLC
Cebuano Culture: Funeral Practices and Burial Customs in the Philippines, Sinulog Festival, Sandugo, List of Bohol Festivals, Cebuano Theater Books LLC

Cebuano Culture: Funeral Practices and Burial Customs in the Philippines, Sinulog Festival, Sandugo, List of Bohol Festivals, Cebuano Theater

Books LLC

Published May 26th 2010
ISBN : 9781156944745
Paperback
52 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Funeral Practices and Burial Customs in the Philippines, Sinulog Festival, Sandugo, List of Bohol Festivals, Cebuano Theater, Gab, Handuraw, Sandugo Festival, Lapu-Lapu Shrine, Pastores de Sibonga, 2006 Dalit Bisaya, Magellan Shrine.MoreChapters: Funeral Practices and Burial Customs in the Philippines, Sinulog Festival, Sandugo, List of Bohol Festivals, Cebuano Theater, Gab, Handuraw, Sandugo Festival, Lapu-Lapu Shrine, Pastores de Sibonga, 2006 Dalit Bisaya, Magellan Shrine. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 51. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Funeral practices and burial customs in the Philippines encompass a wide range of personal, cultural, and traditional beliefs and practices which Filipinos observe in relation to bereavement, dying, honoring, respecting, interring, and remembering their departed loved ones, relatives, and friends. Sources of the various practices include religious teachings, vestiges of colonialism, and regional variations on these. In the past and in present times, Filipinos believe in the afterlife and give attention to respecting and paying homage to dead people. Wakes are generally held from 3 to 7 days. Provincial wakes are usually held in the home, while city dwellers typically display their dead at a funeral home. Apart from spreading the news about someones death verbally, obituaries are also published in newspapers. Although the majority of the Filipino people are Christians, they have retained superstitious beliefs concerning death. When a person dies in the Philippines, Christian Filipinos such as Catholics that include the Tagalog people generally hold a wake known as lamay or paglalamay, a vigil that typically lasts for five to seven nights, but may last longer if the surviving family is waiting for someone who will be traveling from afar. Durign this time, the cleaned and embalmed body of the dead, placed in a coffin, is displayed at the house of deceased or at a funeral home. The exhibited casket of the departed is traditionally surrounded by funeral lights, a guest regist...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=26378514