Home » Annals of Miles Ancestry in Pennsylvania and Story of a Forged Will by Charles H. Banes
Annals of Miles Ancestry in Pennsylvania and Story of a Forged Will Charles H. Banes

Annals of Miles Ancestry in Pennsylvania and Story of a Forged Will

Charles H. Banes

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230379074
Paperback
36 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...her aunt and Mr. MilesMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...her aunt and Mr. Miles sister, Lydia. Mrs. Duffield stated that her aunt, Miss Elizabeth Davis, of Davisville, had gone there to ask for a contribution for a charitable and religious institution, which led to Mr. Miles remark about the will. A deposition was read from Miss Davis, who is a daughter of the late General John Davis, corroborating Mrs. Dufhelds testimony and stating that Griffith Miles had frequently volunteered information of this kind, remarking that the law would make a will good enough for him. The deposition was filed. Rev. J. B. Krewson, of Forest Grove, had known Mr. Miles intimately, and was entirely familiar with his handwriting. He had written many receipts which Mr. Miles had signed. In looking at the signature upon the will he stated that he wouldnt recognize it as Mr. Miles signature. Rev. Mr. Krewson had also heard Mr. Miles say he would never make a will. He said this in March, 1887. Frank Hoffman testified that he heard Mr. Miles say in 1886, more than a year after the alleged will was written, that he had not made a will, and did not intend to make one. What church did you represent? asked Mr. Lear. The Old School Baptist, gravely responded the witness, apparently not disconcerted by the mirth that his reply invoked. The Court added the suggestion that is by no means a bad religion. His Honor was evidently impressed with the sincerity of the witness. WEDNESDAY MORNING Mrs. Kate Smith, of Erwinna, was the first witness called on Wednesday morning. At one time she lived in the home of Griffith Miles, for about two years, and never saw Mrs. Weaver there during that time. She, too, had heard Mr. Miles say he would never make a will. Mrs. Smith had been housekeeper for Mr....